Lexing Ying to receive James H. Wilkinson Prize

San Diego, CA–Stanford University’s Lexing Ying will receive the 2013 James H. Wilkinson Prize in Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing.

Dr. Ying’s research, concerned with the design of fast and accurate numerical algorithms for fundamental problems in scientific computing, displays his exceptional skills as both mathematical analyst and computational scientist, combining ideas from approximation theory, probability, special functions theory, multiscale analysis and parallel computing. Dr. Ying has made outstanding contributions in many areas, including the rapid evaluation of oscillatory integral transforms, high frequency wave propagation and the computation of electron structure in metallic systems.

Lexing Ying receives James H. Wilkinson Prize from SIAM President Irene Fonseca.

A professor of mathematics at Stanford University, Dr. Ying’s research interests are in applied and computational mathematics. He received a Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship in 2007 and an NSF Career award in 2009.

Established in 1979, the James H. Wilkinson Prize in Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing is awarded for research in, or other contributions to, numerical analysis and scientific computing during the six years preceding the award. The prize is given to encourage and award early career contributors in the field.

Dr. Ying will deliver the prize lecture titled, “Interpolative Decomposition and Novel Operator Factorizations” at the SIAM Annual Meeting to be held July 8-12 at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center in San Diego, California. The lecture will take place in the Town & Country room at 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 11. He will receive his award at the Prizes and Awards Luncheon to be held on Tuesday, July 9, in the Golden Ballroom.

Read more details on the prize and the 2013 associated lecture.

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About SIAM
The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is an international society of over 14,000 individual members, including applied and computational mathematicians and computer scientists, as well as other scientists and engineers. Members from 85 countries are researchers, educators, students, and practitioners in industry, government, laboratories, and academia. The Society, which also includes nearly 500 academic and corporate institutional members, serves and advances the disciplines of applied mathematics and computational science by publishing a variety of books and prestigious peer-reviewed research journals, by conducting conferences, and by hosting activity groups in various areas of mathematics. SIAM provides many opportunities for students including regional sections and student chapters. Further information is available at www.siam.org.

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