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Better fracking with computational models

The process of hydraulic fracturing , commonly known as “fracking”, involves injecting large volumes of water into impermeable rocks such as shale in an effort to create flow paths for fluids such as oil and gas. This process often generates tiny earthquakes (or microseismic events) which in turn can be used as passive seismic sources for imaging the subsurface. In this video, researchers Susan Minkoff and Rosalie Belanger-Rioux describe computational modeling techniques that can be used to estimate the location of these microseismic events and the uncertainty inherent in this process. They discuss microseismic event location in the context of hydraulic fracturing and modeling of methane hydrates. Watch the video!

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Modeling coastal vegetation

Understanding the flow of water through complex coastal regions can be of interest for a number of applications, like wetland health and restoration, inland flooding due to tropical storms and hurricanes, and navigation through coastal waters. The existence of vegetation in coastal regions increases the flow resistance, which helps determine velocity and water level distribution in wetlands and inland. In this video, Steven Mattis of the University of Texas at Austin talks about computational modeling of flow and transport through idealized coastal vegetation in order to better understand it.

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Video: Modeling storm surge to better protect Texas

The recent floods in Texas have caused some of the worst flooding since Hurricane Ike in 2008, causing the rainiest month in the state’s history.

What lessons have been learned from Ike’s devastation of the Galveston and Houston area, and how have they helped in the prediction of future such storms?

Researchers at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin have been studying computational models and simulations of hurricanes like Ike in order to predict the consequences of such natural disasters and better prepare the Texas Gulf Coast for their effects.

Environmental and coastal ocean engineering models yield complex systems that combine interdisciplinary techniques. Accurate and efficient simulation requires advanced tools in high performance scientific computing. Watch the video below, where Jennifer Proft of UT Austin discusses new ideas for the high resolution modeling of extreme weather such as hurricane storm surge and floods:


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Modeling brain tumors

Determining patient specific tumor parameters is important in choosing optimal treatment plans. In this video, researchers Amir Gholaminejad and Andrea Hawkins-Daarud speak about how mathematical models can be used to give more information to doctors than what is possible with traditional MRIs. By using data from these models designed for individual patient’s tumor growth patterns, doctors can make better decisions about the best treatment plans.

Watch the video!

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Data Science: What is it and How to Teach it?

What is data science? Is data science its own field or is it an interdisciplinary mix of computer science, mathematics and statistics, and domain knowledge, or is it really what statisticians have been doing all along? Since data science at scale involves large-scale computation, what is the relation between data science and computational science in research and education?

At a panel at the SIAM Computational Science and Engineering Conference (CSE 2015), in Salt Lake City in March, leaders in data science and computational science discussed the current and future status of data science, its relationship to computational science, opportunities for data and computational scientists and educating future data scientists. Watch the video!

 

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Modeling Green House Gas Emissions

Predicting future changes to the global carbon cycle (and therefore climate) and quantifying anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) both require an understanding of net GHGs emissions and uptake across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. At the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in March (CSE15) in Salt Lake City, Anna Michalak of Carnegie Institution for Science and Stanford University explored some of the core scientific questions related to understanding GHG budgets through the lens of the statistical and computational challenges that arise. She focused on the use of atmospheric observations and applications including the natural and anthropogenic components of methane and carbon dioxide budgets. The discussion included issues related to the solution of spatiotemporal inverse problems, uncertainty quantification, data fusion, gap filling, and issues of “big data” arising from the use of satellite observations.

Watch a brief video of her talk and an interview!

 

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Thinking of Writing a Book?

Ever thought about writing a book? Ever wondered just what that entails? A session at the 2015 SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering will bring together successful authors and publishing staff to discuss the process. Topics of interest will include:

• Why and when you should consider writing a book

• A step-by-step description of the process, from initial idea to published book

• How to choose a publisher Read the rest of this entry »

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Attend the career fair at the SIAM CS&E conference!

Are you attending the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering (CSE15) in Salt Lake City in March? Then you may be interested in the CSE15 career fair sessions being held there on Saturday, March 14.

If you plan to attend the fair, please submit your resume if possible, so it can be provided in advance to the participating employers.

The career fair is an interactive event at which you can speak with employers about working in various industries. It is a great opportunity for you to meet government and industry representatives to discuss what they look for in candidates and what each employer may have to offer. The event is held primarily for graduate students and recent graduates, but job-seekers of all levels are encouraged to attend.

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NSF-SIAM Symposium on Mathematical and Computational Aspects of Materials Science at CSE15

The 2015 SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering (CSE15) will host a one-day Symposium on Mathematical and Computational Aspects of Materials Science.  The symposium is sponsored jointly by the National Science Foundation and SIAM.  CSE15 will be held in Salt Lake City, and the symposium is scheduled for Saturday, March 14, 2015. Ten leading researchers from the materials science and mathematical sciences communities will give their perspective on areas of research where mathematicians and materials scientists can find exciting opportunities for significant collaboration. A panel session is part of the symposium, where the directors of the NSF divisions for Mathematical Sciences (DMS) and Materials Research (DMR) will describe existing mechanisms for funding collaborations. Details can be found on the symposium web site http://www.siam.org/meetings/cse15/symposium.php.

 

 

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Travel Awards deadline for ICIAM15 extended

The deadline for applications for travel awards to attend ICIAM 2015 is fast approaching. Due to the extension of the ICIAM15 minisymposium acceptance notification to December 15, the SIAM travel awards deadline has been extended to January 9, 2015. There’s less than a month left. Apply now!

To submit an application, go to http://www.siam.org/meetings/iciam15/. Read the terms of the grants and follow the instructions.

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