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Announcing the 2013 Class of SIAM Fellows

Fellow_LOGOFinal-ol-273_resize1Philadelphia, PA –SIAM is pleased to announce the newly selected Class of SIAM Fellows, distinguished members of SIAM nominated for exemplary research as well as outstanding service to the community. Through their contributions, the 2013 Class of Fellows is helping advance the fields of applied mathematics and computational science. SIAM congratulates these 33 members of our community: 

2013 Class of SIAM Fellows recognized at the Prizes and Awards Luncheon held at the SIAM Annual Meeting in San Diego in July.

2013 Class of SIAM Fellows recognized at the Prizes and Awards Luncheon held at the SIAM Annual Meeting in San Diego in July.

Randolph Bank of the University of California, San Diego, is being recognized for contributions to multilevel iterative methods and adaptive numerical methods for partial differential equations. A professor of mathematics at UCSD, Dr. Bank’s research interests are in the numerical solution of partial differential equations by adaptive finite element methods, and multilevel and domain decomposition iterative solvers for large linear systems. He has served on the editorial boards of SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing and Multiscale Modeling and Simulation.

Kaushik Bhattacharya is being conferred Fellowship for his contributions to mathematical aspects of materials science, especially the modeling of martensitic transformation and its consequences. Dr. Bhattacharya is a professor of mechanics and materials science at the California Institute of Technology, and          studies the design, development, and creation of new materials, the optimization of materials processing, as well as thin films, composite materials, and methods for a unified molecular-continuum description of materials. He previously served as Program Director for the SIAM Activity Group on Mathematical Aspects of Materials Science.

Jerry Bona, professor of mathematics at the University of Illinois at Chicago, is being honored for fundamental contributions to nonlinear waves. Dr. Bona’s research interests include fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, computational mathematics and the associated numerical analysis, oceanography, coastal engineering and mathematical economics. Dr. Bona has served as the Editor-in-Chief of SIAM Journal on Mathematical Analysis and as Vice President of the Activity Group on Nonlinear Waves and Coherent Structures. He has also previously served on the SIAM Managing Editors Committee and the Committee on Committees and Appointments.

Oscar Bruno of the California Institute of Technology is being recognized for his contributions to the theory of composite materials and the numerical simulation of wave phenomena. Dr. Bruno is a professor of applied and computational mathematics at Caltech. His group works on the development of accurate, high-performance numerical PDE solvers applicable to realistic scientific and engineering configurations. His research interests include numerical analysis, multiphysics modeling and simulation, and mathematical physics. He is a current member of the SIAM Council, and has previously served on the editorial boards of SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing and SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics.

John Burns is being conferred Fellowship for his contributions to control and approximation of partial differential equations. Dr. Burns is a professor of mathematics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His area of research spans applied and computational control, partial differential equations, distributed parameter systems, fluid/structural control systems, smart materials, and modeling and control of high performance buildings. Dr. Burns has served as Vice President of SIAM, was the founding Editor of the SIAM Book Series on Advances in Design and Control, and is a past Chair of the SIAM Activity Group on Systems and Control. He was awarded the SIAM Reid Prize in 2010.

Raymond Honfu Chan is a professor and Chair of the Department of Mathematics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is being recognized for advances in numerical linear algebra and imaging science, including the theory of Toeplitz solvers. His research interests are in scientific computation, numerical linear algebra, and image processing. Dr. Chan has served on the editorial boards of SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing and SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences. He has also previously served as the Vice-President of the East Asia Section of SIAM. He is a SIAM book author.

Andrew Conn of IBM’s T. J. Watson Research Center is being conferred SIAM Fellowship for his fundamental contributions to optimization theory, software, and industrial practice. Dr. Conn, who is a member of the Numerical Analysis Group in the Mathematical Sciences Department at the Watson Research Center, has interests in mathematical programming, numerical linear algebra, numerical algorithms, large-scale algorithms, small-scale methods, and software development. He has previously served on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Optimization and chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Optimization.

Benoit Couet is Scientific Advisor and Program Manager for the Uncertainty, Risk and Optimization Program in the Mathematics and Modeling Department at Schlumberger-Doll Research. He is being recognized for contributions to optimization under uncertainty and its implementation in industrial practice, and for leadership in mentoring young researchers. His research interests are in numerical optimization, statistical analysis, uncertainty modeling, probability theory, and financial mathematics.

Timothy Davis, a professor of computer science at the University of Florida, is being recognized for his contributions to sparse matrix algorithms and software, including the University of Florida Sparse Matrix Collection.  His research interests are in sparse matrix algorithms, computational science, numerical methods, and applied mathematics. Dr. Davis is a SIAM book author and currently serves as a SIAM Council member. He is also on the editorial board of the SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing. 

Qiang Du of Penn State University is being honored for contributions to applied and computational mathematics with applications in material science, computational geometry, and biology. A professor of mathematics at PSU, his research interests span numerical and applied analysis, parallel and adaptive algorithms, superfluids, complex fluids, biomembranes, phase transitions, data mining, model reduction, meshing, and image analysis. Dr. Du has served on the editorial boards of SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis and SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics. He was the founding faculty advisor for the Penn State SIAM student chapter.

Michael Ferris is a professor of computer science at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. He is being conferred SIAM Fellowship for his contributions to mathematical programming algorithms, computation, and theory, particularly in the area of complementarity. His areas of research interest are mathematical programming, modeling and applications of operations research, optimization in medicine, complementarity problems, grid computation, and numerical algorithms. Dr. Ferris previously served as Chair of the SIAM Activity Group on Optimization, and on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization. He is currently on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Optimization.

Christodoulos Floudas of Princeton University is being recognized for contributions to global optimization and its application to a wide range of problems spanning systems engineering and computational biology. A professor of chemical and biological engineering at Princeton, his work addresses fundamental problems in process synthesis and design, interaction of design and control, process operations, discrete-continuous nonlinear optimization, deterministic global optimization, computational chemistry, structural biology, and bioinformatics.

Michel Goemans is a professor of applied mathematics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is being recognized by SIAM for his contributions to combinatorial optimization, and in particular to the design and analysis of approximation algorithms. His research is in the area of discrete algorithms, approximation algorithms, combinatorial optimization, and semidefinite programming. He has been awarded the SIAM Activity Group on Optimization Prize twice—in the years 1996 and 1999. He has previously been a member of the editorial boards of SIAM Journal on Discrete Mathematics and SIAM Journal on Optimization.

Andrew Goldberg, a principal researcher at Microsoft Research, is being honored for his fundamental contributions in the design, analysis, and implementation of algorithms for network optimization problems.  Dr. Goldberg’s research interests are in design, analysis, and experimental evaluation of algorithms, data structures, algorithm engineering, and computational game theory.

Alan Hastings is a professor in the Department of Environmental Science & Policy at the University of California, Davis. He is being conferred this Fellowship for his leadership in theoretical ecology, helping to lay the foundation for scientifically-based agriculture and resource management. His areas of research include population biology, mathematical biology, and theoretical ecology, specifically, structured populations, complex dynamics, and model fitting.

Sze-Bi Hsu, a professor at National Tsing Hua University, is being recognized for contributions to mathematical ecology, and in particular the theory of the chemostat and competing species in ecology. His areas of research include mathematical biology, chaotic vibrating strings, and mechanics and gas dynamics.

Shi Jin is a professor of mathematics at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University and at University of Wisconsin—Madison. He is being conferred this Fellowship for contributions to relaxation schemes, numerical algorithms for kinetic equations and high frequency wave propagation. His areas of interest are in numerical and applied analysis of hyperbolic conservation laws, kinetic theory, Hamilton-Jacobi equations and front propagations, computational fluid dynamics, and high frequency waves. Dr. Jin has previously served on the editorial boards of SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics and SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing.

David Kinderlehrer is a professor of mathematics and a professor of materials science and engineering  at Carnegie Mellon University. He is being honored for contributions to nonlinear partial differential equations, the calculus of variations, and mathematical aspects of materials science. His interest is in applied analysis in materials science applications, variational inequalities, the calculus of variations, and PDEs. Dr. Kinderlehrer played an important role in forming SIAM’s Activity Group on Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (APDE), serving as Secretary for the SIAG for two terms and co-chairing the first SIAM APDE meeting. He has also served on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Mathematical Analysis and is a SIAM book author.

Edgar Knobloch is a professor at University of California, Berkeley. He is being recognized by SIAM for his important contributions to pattern formation and nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation theory, and fluid dynamics. Dr. Knobloch’s research interests are in plasma physics, nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation theory, theory of nonlinear waves, pattern formation in fluid systems, reaction-diffusion systems, theory of turbulent transport, and the theory of turbulence. He is currently on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems. He has previously vice-chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Nonlinear Waves and Coherent Structures and served on the advisory board of the SIAG on Dynamical Systems.

C. David Levermore is being recognized for contributions in understanding how large-scale behaviors emerge from dynamics or structures on small-scales by establishing fluid dynamical limits from the Boltzmann equations and taking semiclassical limits of nonlinear wave equations. A professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Maryland, College Park, his areas of research interest include statistical physics, large-scale behaviors, numerical analysis, and multiscale problems. Dr. Levermore is currently SIAM’s Vice President for Science Policy and a member of the SIAM Council. He previously served on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics and on the Mathematics in Industry Steering Committee.

Marc Mangel is one of the world’s leading mathematical biologists. He has made fundamental contributions to behavioral ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries management, and is breaking new ground in theory underlying the biology of stem cells. He is an outstanding mentor and important contributor to the applied mathematics community. For these reasons, he is being recognized as a SIAM Fellow. He is a professor of mathematical biology at University of California, Santa Cruz. His interests lie in mathematical and theoretical biology, with a focus on ecology, evolution, and behavior. He chaired the SIAM-AMS Committee on Mathematics in the Life Sciences several years ago, and served on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics.

Hans Othmer is being conferred Fellowship for contributions to mathematical biology, in particular the theory of pattern formation in biological systems. A professor of mathematics at the University of Minnesota, his research interests are in mathematical biology, dynamical systems, stochastic models, reaction/gene networks, reaction-diffusion mechanisms, pattern formation, cell control circuits, cell motility, hybrid discrete/continuum models, and excitable systems. He has previously served on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics and on the SIAM-AMS Committee on Mathematics in the Life Sciences.

Haesun Park of Georgia Institute of Technology is being honored for contributions to numerical analysis and the data sciences. Dr. Park is a professor and Associate Chair of the School of Computational Science and Engineering at Georgia Tech. Dr. Park’s areas of research interest are numerical computing, data analysis, visual analytics, bioinformatics, and parallel computing. She previously served on the editorial boards of SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications and SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing. She has co-chaired and served on the program committees of past SIAM conferences on data mining.

Robert Plemmons is a professor of mathematics and computer science at Wake Forest University. He is being conferred SIAM Fellowship for contributions to matrix theory and algorithms, especially nonnegative matrices and computational methods for signal and image processing. His areas of research span scientific computation, numerical linear algebra, ill-posed inverse problems, image processing, and remote sensing. Dr. Plemmons has previously served on the SIAM Council and Board of Trustees. He was the founding Vice Chair of both the SIAM Activity Group on Linear Algebra and the SIAG on Imaging Science. He has written and edited several SIAM books.

John Rinzel of New York University is being conferred Fellowship for contributions to mathematical neuroscience and mathematical physiology, in particular the dissection of complex fast-slow dynamical systems. Dr. Rinzel is a professor of neural science and mathematics at NYU. His areas of interest are in computational neuroscience, mathematical physiology, biophysical mechanisms, nonlinear mathematical systems, dynamical systems theory, and excitable systems. Dr. Rinzel has chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Life Sciences in the past and served on the SIAM-AMS Committee on Mathematics in the Life Sciences. He has served on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics.

Björn Sandstede, a professor of applied mathematics at Brown University, is being recognized for contributions to applied dynamical systems involving the computational and analytical study of pattern formation in physical and biological systems. His research interests include dynamical systems, ordinary and partial differential equations, dynamics and stability of patterns, nonlinear waves, homoclinic and heteroclinic phenomena, and nonlinear optics. He has previously received the SIAM Outstanding Paper Prize as well as the JD Crawford Prize, which is awarded by the SIAM Activity Group on Dynamical Systems. He has chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Nonlinear Waves and Coherent Structures and served as Program Director for the SIAG on Dynamical Systems.

Guillermo Sapiro of Duke University is being recognized for contributions to the theory and practice in the fields of image processing and computer vision. A professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke, his research spans image processing, computer vision, biomedical and brain imaging, computational tools in cryo-tomography, differential geometry and differential equations, high-dimensional data analysis, sparse modeling, and dictionary learning. Dr. Sapiro was the founding Editor-in-Chief of SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences and continues to serve on the journal’s editorial board. He was actively involved in the development of the SIAM conference series on Imaging Sciences.

Michael Saunders of Stanford University is being honored for his contributions to numerical optimization and linear algebra, and software. A professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford, his areas of research include numerical optimization, numerical linear algebra, linear and nonlinear programming, sparse matrix methods, iterative solvers, constrained optimization, and sparse linear equations. Last year, he received the SIAM Linear Algebra Prize, which is awarded by the SIAM Activity Group on Linear Algebra. Dr. Saunders served on the inaugural editorial board of SIAM Journal on Optimization.

Larry Schumaker is being conferred Fellowship for his contributions to the theory and applications of spline functions, geometric design, and finite elements. A professor of mathematics at Vanderbilt University, Dr. Schumaker’s areas of interest are in approximation theory, spline functions, computer aided geometric design, and numerical analysis. He has helped organize past SIAM conferences on geometric design.

Horst Simon is Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Deputy Director. He is being honored by SIAM for contributions to parallel computational methods and service to the computational science community. His research involves the development of sparse matrix algorithms, algorithms for large-scale eigenvalue problems, and domain decomposition algorithms for unstructured domains for parallel processing. He has previously chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Supercomputing, and served on the editorial board of SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing. He is a SIAM book author.

Peter Turner is being recognized with a SIAM Fellowship for his leadership in advancing applied mathematical education, including the creation of SIAM Undergraduate Research Online (SIURO). Dr. Turner is Dean of Arts and Sciences and a professor of mathematics at Clarkson University. His research interests are in computer arithmetic, level-index system, functional analysis, optimization, numerical analysis, parallel processing, computer vision, and computer algebra. Dr. Turner is the current SIAM Vice President for Education. In addition to being the founding Editor-in-Chief of SIURO, he has participated in and organized several outreach activities on behalf of SIAM, including the SIAM-NSF Modeling across the Curriculum initiative, SIAM partnership with the Museum of Mathematics, SIAM participation in USA Science and Engineering Festivals, and chaired the working group that produced the SIAM Report on undergraduate computational science and engineering education.

Pauline van den Driessche is being recognized for contributions to linear algebra and mathematical biology. Dr. van den Driessche is a professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Victoria. She works on mathematical problems in biology, particularly deterministic models of populations and epidemics, dynamical systems and applications, matrix problems related to stability, combinatorial matrix analysis, and max algebra. Dr. van den Driessche currently serves on the editorial board of SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics.

James Yorke is being conferred SIAM Fellowship for contributions to the understanding and application of chaotic dynamics. Dr. Yorke, a professor of mathematics and physics at the University of Maryland, College Park, researches chaos theory, chaotic dynamics, weather prediction, genome research, period doubling cascades, nonlinear dynamics of computer networks, and population dynamics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Dr. Yorke received SIAM’s Jürgen Moser Lecture/award in 2011. He serves as the faculty advisor for the University of Maryland SIAM student chapter.

The Class of 2013 Fellows will be honored at the SIAM Annual Meeting to be held in San Diego in July.

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About SIAM
The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is an international society of over 14,000 individual members, including applied and computational mathematicians and computer scientists, as well as other scientists and engineers. Members from 85 countries are researchers, educators, students, and practitioners in industry, government, laboratories, and academia. The Society, which also includes nearly 500 academic and corporate institutional members, serves and advances the disciplines of applied mathematics and computational science by publishing a variety of books and prestigious peer-reviewed research journals, by conducting conferences, and by hosting activity groups in various areas of mathematics. SIAM provides many opportunities for students including regional sections and student chapters. Further information is available at www.siam.org.

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