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SIAM names 2011 Fellows

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) today named 34 academics and professionals to its 2011 Class of Fellows for their outstanding contributions to applied mathematics and computational science through research in the field and service to the larger community. This distinguished group of individuals from wide-ranging areas was nominated by the SIAM community and will be recognized in July at the 7th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2011) in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Please read details about their accomplishments and affiliations below:

Mark J. Ablowitz, Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Colorado, Boulder, is being recognized for his contributions to research in the theory and applications of nonlinear waves. His work uses mathematical models to describe and understand physical phenomena by approximation, numerical and exact methods. A pioneer in the field, Ablowitz is a highly-cited researcher and SIAM book author. He is best known for his research in the area of “inverse scattering transform,” a method employed to solve nonlinear wave equations. He received a Sloan Fellowship for his early-career research in the mid-seventies, and went on to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1984.

Kendall E. Atkinson, Professor Emeritus at the University of Iowa, is acknowledged for his work and teaching in the area of numerical analysis of integral equations. His research interests also include boundary integral equation methods, multivariate approximation, interpolation, and quadrature. Dr. Atkinson is a professor at both the departments of computer science and mathematics at the University of Iowa. He is renowned for his research in all areas of numerical analysis and is a well-known book author. He served two three-year terms in the SIAM Council from 1984 through 1989, and is a former editor of the SIAM Journal of Numerical Analysis.

Claude W. Bardos is being honored for his work in bringing together industrial problems and advanced theory of partial differential equations. His work spans the areas of microlocal analysis and theorems of propagation, kinetic and fluid mechanics equations, and microlocal theory and its applications. Professor Bardos is Professeur Emérite from the Laboratoire Jacques Louis Lions, Université Pierre et Marie Curie. Throughout his career, he has had well-known ties with the industry, having consulted and directed projects at various companies. He won the Humboldt Prize in 1993 and is a well-known book author.

John T.  Betts is being recognized for industrial applications and computational methods in optimal control and nonlinear programming. Now retired from The Boeing Company, he was formerly a technical fellow in the Mathematics and Computing Technology Division at the company where he provided technical support to all areas of the organization. Dr. Betts continues his research in nonlinear programming and optimal control theory. A highly influential researcher, he has affected the practice of optimization in industry and academia for many years. Dr. Betts helped design the well-known SOCS optimal control software package and is a SIAM book author.

Charles R. Doering, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Michigan, analyzes mathematical models of physical systems with the objective of formulating reliable, rigorous, and useful predictions. The work he has done in the field toward the understanding of phenomena in nonlinear and stochastic dynamical systems, turbulent transport, and mixing is being acknowledged with this fellowship. Dr. Doering is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and received the Humboldt Research Award in 2003.

Jim Douglas Jr., Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago, is being recognized for his research on numerical methods for partial differential equations, specifically their applications to the simulation of flows in porous media.  His general areas of interest include computational modeling and numerical analysis, simulation of flows in porous media, attenuated waves, and inverse and non-well-posed problems. He is the Compere and Marcella Loveless Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Computational Mathematics at Purdue University. A well-known researcher in the field, he has published over 200 papers.

Alan S. Edelman is Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is being honored for his contributions in bringing together mathematics and industry in the areas of numerical linear algebra, random matrix theory, and parallel computing. In addition to consulting for leading companies likes IBM and Pixar, he founded Interactive Supercomputing, a software company, which was recently acquired by Microsoft. His research group at MIT is focused on high performance computing, numerical computation, linear algebra and stochastic eigenanalysis. Dr. Edelman received the SIAM Activity Group on Linear Algebra Prize in 2000 and the SIAM Outstanding Paper Prize in 2001.

Charbel Farhat of Stanford University is being honored for his exemplary contributions to parallel computing and modeling, and the simulation of fluid-structure interaction problems. His research group is involved in the design and analysis of complex systems in aerospace, marine, mechanical, and naval engineering through the development of mathematical models, advanced computational algorithms, and high-performance software. He is the Vivian Church Hoff Professor of Aircraft Structures, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Chair of the Aeronautics and Astronautics department at Stanford. He has given invited talks at past SIAM conferences, and served as Vice Chair of the SIAM Activity Group on Supercomputing from 2003 to 2005.

Jean-Pierre Fouque is being acknowledged for his research contributions in the area of financial mathematics and asymptotic analysis for random media. A well-known probabilist with over 60 publications, Dr. Foque is a professor of statistics and applied probability and Director of the Center for Research in Financial Mathematics and Statistics at the University of California Santa Barbara. His interests are in the areas of financial mathematics, waves in random media, stochastic processes and partial differential equations. He is a former Chair of the SIAM Activity Group on Financial Mathematics and Engineering.

Alan M. Frieze is a professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. He is being acknowledged for his pioneering work on random graphs and probabilistic analysis of combinatorial algorithms. His research work focuses on probabilistic combinatorics and its applications in theoretical computer science and operations research. He received the Fulkerson Prize in Discrete Mathematics in 1991 jointly with Ravi Kannan for the development of an algorithm for approximating volumes of convex sets. He is a Guggenheim Fellow.

Kenneth M. Golden is Professor of Mathematics and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Utah. His interests span the areas of sea ice, climate change, composite materials, phase transitions, and inverse problems. He is being honored for his exemplary interdisciplinary research in the mathematics of sea ice. Dr. Golden’s fascination for the frigid zones started in high school when he began studying satellite images of sea ice; he went on to conduct cold regions research for the US Army. He has traveled on six Antarctic and five Arctic expeditions to research sea ice. He has been an invited speaker and served on the organizing committees of past SIAM conferences.

Thomas A. Grandine is a Senior Technical Fellow in Engineering Operations and Technology at The Boeing Company. He is being recognized for his contributions in computer-aided geometric design in addition to his leadership in industrial mathematics. A specialist in geometric modeling and numerical analysis, his research interests include curve and surface modeling, numerical approximation, splines, and multidisciplinary design optimization. He is currently SIAM’s Vice President for Industry and former Chair of the Activity Group on Geometric Design.

William D. Gropp is the Paul and Cynthia Saylor Professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He is also the Deputy Director for Research at the Institute for Advanced Computing Applications and Technologies at the National Academy of Engineering. He is being acknowledged for his development of algorithms and software for high performance scientific computing, including the development of MPI. He received the IEEE’s Sidney Fernbach Award in 2008. Dr. Gropp has been an invited speaker at past SIAM conferences, and chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Supercomputing from 2003 to 2005.

Philip Holmes of Princeton University is being conferred the fellowship for his extensive contributions to nonlinear dynamics, where he has developed a wide range of theories and applications. Dr. Holmes is Eugene Higgins Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and an associate faculty member in the Department of Mathematics at Princeton University. He studies nonlinear dynamics and differential equations, and develops mathematical models of solid, fluid, and biological systems, in addition to qualitative and analytical methods to study them. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Visiting Lecturer for SIAM.

Ilse C. F. Ipsen is being acknowledged for her research contributions in numerical linear algebra, perturbation theory, and their applications. Dr. Ipsen is a professor of mathematics at North Carolina State University where she researches numerical linear algebra, matrix theory, numerical analysis, and randomized algorithms. She previously served as Chair of the SIAM Activity Group on Linear Algebra and was SIAM’s Vice President for Programs until 2009. She is a SIAM book author and serves on the Editorial Board of SIAM Review.

Christopher K. R. T. Jones is the Bill Guthridge Distinguished Professor at the Mathematics Department of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is being recognized for extraordinary research in a wide variety of fields ranging from dynamical systems, nonlinear partial differential equations, and applications in nonlinear optics, ocean dynamics, and neuroscience. He received the Humboldt Award in 1993 for recognition of his fundamental discoveries in the field and internationally recognized academic qualifications. He previously served on the Editorial Board of the SIAM Journal of Dynamical Systems.

David E. Keyes is the Fu Foundation Professor of Applied Mathematics in the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics at Columbia University. He also holds several faculty affiliate positions at the U.S. Department of Energy’s national labs, and is a professor of applied mathematics and computational science at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia. He is being honored for his long-standing dedication to serving the scientific community and his research into implicit methods for the solution of partial differential equations. His research interests include parallel numerical algorithms, parallel performance analysis, and PDE-constrained optimization. Dr. Keyes served as SIAM’s Vice President-at-Large from 2006 to 2009. Dr. Keyes has been a SIAM Visiting Lecturer since 1992. He is a past member of the SIAM Council and a SIAM book author.

Suzanne M. Lenhart of the University of Tennessee is being recognized for her research in optimal control with biological and physical applications and her significant contributions to advance undergraduate research. In addition to optimal control, she studies partial differential equations and disease, population, environmental and natural resource models. Dr. Lenhart has spent many years encouraging women and underrepresented minorities to pursue mathematics and related fields. She was awarded the AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lectureship at SIAM’s annual meeting last year in acknowledgment of her contributions. She is a past member of the SIAM Board of Trustees and serves on the education committees of AWM and SIAM.

John G. Lewis, now retired, was a Technical Fellow with The Boeing Company and then a Senior Principal Engineer with Cray.  He is an affiliate professor in computer science and engineering at the University of Washington and a member of the Advisory Board for the university’s CSE Access Computing Alliance. His contributions to sparse linear algebra and high performance computing are being acknowledged with this fellowship. Dr. Lewis was a former member of the SIAM Board of Trustees and of the SIAM Council. He currently serves on the SIAM Financial Management and Systems Oversight Committees.

Zhi-Quan (Tom) Luo, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Minnesota, is being conferred this fellowship for the development of novel applied mathematics ideas and methods for signal processing and digital communication. After being selected for graduate study in the United States by a joint AMS-SIAM committee in 1984, he moved from China and has since continued his research in theory, design and analysis of efficient optimization algorithms, which have applications in data communication, wireless and optical networks and systems, and signal processing. He was awarded INFORMS’ Farkas Prize in 2010 for significant contributions to the field of optimization.

Olvi L. Mangasarian is a research scientist at the University of California San Diego. He is being recognized for seminal contributions to the theory and algorithms of optimization and their applications to machine learning. Dr. Mangasarian is retired from the University of Wisconsin Madison. A research associate at the Department of Mathematics at University of California San Diego, his areas of interest include optimization, data mining, classification and support vector machines. He is a past recipient of the Department of Energy’s Computational Science Award and the INFORMS Lanchester Prize. Dr. Mangasarian is a SIAM book author and a past invited speaker at SIAM conferences.

Bernard J. Matkowsky of Northwestern University has been selected as a SIAM Fellow for his range of contributions to asymptotic and perturbation methods, bifurcation theory, nonlinear dynamics, pattern formation, stochastic dynamical systems and combustion theory. He is John Evans Professor of Applied Mathematics, and a professor of mathematics and mechanical engineering at Northwestern University. A highly-cited researcher, Dr. Matkowsky is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a Guggenheim Fellow.

James McKenna, formerly head of the Mathematical Sciences Research Center at Bell Laboratories, is being acknowledged for his mathematical contributions to the underpinnings of telecommunications products and for his extensive support in furthering the goals of SIAM. He has conducted research in the areas of quantum mechanics, classical mathematical physics, stochastic differential equations, and numerical analysis. He was the Vice President of SIAM from 1980-81 and served as the Vice President for Programs from 1982-85. Dr. McKenna currently serves on SIAM’s Mathematics in Industry Steering Committee.

Volker Mehrmann is being recognized for his work in numerical linear algebra, matrix theory, differential-algebraic equations, mathematical software, and for facilitating the exchange of knowledge between academia and industry. A Full Professor at the Institut fur Mathematik at the Technische Universität Berlin, his field of study includes applied linear algebra, analysis of differential-algebraic equations, numerical solution of partial differential equations, control theory and associated industrial applications. He is a highly-cited researcher and book author. He was previously the Associate Editor for the SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications and Vice Chair of the SIAM Linear Algebra Activity Group from 1998 to 2001.

Boris Mordukhovich is Distinguished University Professor and President of the Academy of Scholars at Wayne State University. He is being conferred the SIAM fellowship for his contributions to variational analysis, optimization, and optimal control. Dr. Mordukhovich is highly-regarded for his over three decades of research work in nonlinear analysis, optimization, and control theory. His areas of study also include variational analysis and generalized differentiation. He serves on the Editorial Board of the SIAM Journal on Optimization.

Bill Morton is being recognized for his exemplary contributions in numerical methods for partial differential equations. A pioneer in the development of finite difference, finite element and finite volume methods for the numerical solution of PDEs, Dr. Morton is Emeritus Professor and Emeritus Fellow of the University of Oxford. His other areas of interest include fluid flows applications, convection-diffusion problems, error analysis and stability theory, and hyperbolic conservation law systems. He is a Past President of the UK and Republic of Ireland SIAM section.

Ricardo H. Nochetto of the University of Maryland is being awarded this recognition for his study of free boundary problems and phase transitions. His research interests include finite element methods, adaptivity, and related partial differential equations issues in the areas of free boundary problems and phase transitions. A well-known numerical analyst, Dr. Nochetto is a professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Maryland at College Park. He received the SIAM Outstanding Paper Prize in 2001.

Beresford N. Parlett, Professor Emeritus of the University of California Berkeley, is being recognized for his contributions in the area of numerical linear algebra. His research focus is in numerical analysis and scientific computation. Dr. Parlett was awarded the SIAM/Linear Algebra Prize in 2006, and received the Hans Schneider Prize from the International Linear Algebra Society for his theoretical and numerical contributions to numerical linear algebra, specifically, the symmetric eigenvalue problem, in 2008. He is a well-known researcher and a SIAM book author.

Ahmed H. Sameh is conferred the SIAM Fellowship for his pioneering contributions to parallel algorithms for numerical linear algebra. Dr. Sameh is Samuel D. Conte Professor of Computer Science at Purdue University West Lafayette. In addition to numerical linear algebra, he researches the design and performance analysis of parallel numerical algorithms needed in various science and engineering applications. A Fellow of ACM, IEEE, and AAAS, he received the IEEE’s Harry Goode Award for his work in parallel numerical algorithms in 1999. He advises the Purdue University SIAM Chapter and has delivered invited lectures at several SIAM conferences.

Robert D. Skeel is being awarded the fellowship for his notable research in computational molecular biophysics, numerical ordinary differential equations and linear algebra. Professor Skeel is a professor of computer science and mathematics at Purdue University West Lafayette and studies computational methods for biomolecular simulation in order to enhance discovery and research in structures and mechanisms basic to life. He is a well-known researcher and a textbook author. He previously served on the Editorial Board of the SIAM Book Series, Fundamentals of Algorithms.

Craig A. Tracy of the University of California Davis is being acknowledged for fundamental contributions to statistical physics, integrable systems, and probability theory, including random matrix theory and its applications. A Distinguished Professor at the Department of Mathematics at UC Davis, his areas of research focus are statistical mechanics, integrable systems and probability theory. Dr. Tracy received SIAM’s George Polya Prize in 2002 and the AMS-SIAM Norbert Wiener Prize in 2007, both for his remarkable work on random matrix theory. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Stephen J. Wright is a professor in the Computer Sciences Department at the University of Wisconsin Madison. He is being awarded the fellowship for contributions to the theory and computational aspects of linear and nonlinear optimization. Dr. Wright’s main research focus is in numerical optimization, specifically related to real variables (as opposed to integer or discrete). His interests include algorithms, applications, and theory for sparse optimization including applications in compressed sensing and machine learning. Dr. Wright has authored and coauthored four widely-used books in numerical optimization, including a SIAM publication, and has coauthored an interior-point software program for linear and quadratic optimization. He is a member of SIAM’s Board of Trustees.

Jinchao Xu of Pennsylvania State University is being conferred the recognition for his work in the theory and applications of multilevel and adaptive numerical methods. He is a Francis R. and Helen M. Pentz Professor of Science at Penn State, and researches numerical methods for partial differential equations, in particular, finite element methods. He is also interested in multigrid methods with regard to their theoretical analysis, algorithmic developments and practical applications. With over 100 research publications, Dr. Xu is a high-cited mathematician. He was recognized with a Natural Science Award from the National Academy of Science in China in 1989, and went on to receive the Humboldt Award for Senior U.S. Scientists in 2005. He was an invited plenary speaker at the International Congress for Industrial and Applied Mathematics in 2007. He serves on the Editorial Board of the SIAM journal, Multiscale Modeling and Simulation.

Ya-xiang Yuan is a professor at the Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He is being recognized for his contributions to nonlinear optimization and for his leadership of computational mathematics in China. He was previously the director of the Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a position he held for 12 years.  During the time, he also served as one of the vice presidents of the organization’s Academy of Mathematics and System Sciences for eight years. Dr. Yuan has been the President of the Operations Research Society of China since 2004. He was an invited plenary speaker at the International Congress for Industrial and Applied Mathematics in 1999, and serves on the Editorial Board of the SIAM Journal on Optimization.

A full list of the Fellows and their affiliations can be found on the Fellows page at:

http://fellows.siam.org/index.php?sort=year&value=2011

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ABOUT SIAM

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) is an international community of over 13,000 individual members, including applied and computational mathematicians, computer scientists, and other scientists and engineers. SIAM advances the fields of applied mathematics and computational science by publishing a series of premier journals and a variety of books, sponsoring a wide selection of conferences, and through various other programs. More information about SIAM is available at www.siam.org.

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