SIAM Washington Update

CONTENTS

SIAM in DC

SIAM Sends Letter Expressing Concerns with CISE/OCI Merger

SIAM Signs on to Joint Society Letter Expressing Concerns with Restrictions on Scientific Conference Expenses

Notable Funding Opportunities

NASA: NASA Announces Space Technology Graduate Research Fellowships

NSF Announces New Interdisciplinary Hazards Research Program Along with Dear Colleague Letter Seeking Involvement from Mathematicians and Statisticians

DOD:  Office of Naval Research Releases Two FY 2013 Broad Agency Announcements

Sustainability:  NSF Announces New Cyber-Enabled Sustainability Program

Federal Agency News

NSF: Fleming Crim Selected as Next Assistant Director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences

OMB:  OMB Issues Sequester Report Outlining Potential Across-the-Board Spending Reductions in Early January 2013

Innovation: National Academies Releases Report on U.S. Innovation Policy for the Global Economy

Grand Challenges: DARPA and OSTP Release Request for Information on Grand Challenges of the 21st Century

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SIAM in DC

SIAM Sends Letter Expressing Concerns with CISE/OCI Merger

On October 5, SIAM sent a letter to NSF Director Subra Suresh outlining concerns with the recent announcement that the Office of Cyberinfrastructure (OCI) will be moved from the Office of the Director (OD) to the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE).  The letter expresses SIAM’s hope the OCI can continue its excellent work providing research communities access to advanced computing capabilities and its role in the shared stewardship of computational science across NSF.  A copy of the letter to Dr. Suresh can be accessed here:

SIAM Response to the OCI-CISE Merger

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SIAM Signs on to Joint Society Letter Expressing Concerns with Restrictions on Scientific Conference Expenses

On September 10, SIAM along with the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Computing Research Association (CRA), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc. – USA (IEEE-USA) sent a joint letter expressing concern over new restrictions on conferences and travel expenses in three pieces of legislation that are currently under consideration by Congress (GSA Act, DATA Act, and the 21st Century Postal Reform Act).  The letter went to House and Senate leadership, Sponsors of the bills (Reps. Joe Walsh and Darrell Issa, Senator Lieberman), Chair and Ranking Member of the committees of jurisdiction (House Oversight Committee, Reps. Issa and Cummings; Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, Senators Lieberman and Collins), White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren, and White House Office of Management and Budget Director Jeffrey Zients.  The letter requests that any new restrictions exempt recognized scientific, technical, and educational meetings from the proposed limits.  A copy of the letter to Dr. Holdren is here:

Response to GSA Act 2012

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Notable Funding Opportunities

NASA: NASA Announces Space Technology Graduate Research Fellowships

NASA recently announced the third solicitation for Space Technology Research Fellowships.  The Space Technology program is a relatively new program that supports the development of technologies that can be applied across NASA mission directorates to revolutionize both human and robotic space flight.  Topics of interest include modeling, simulation, and data understanding.

Space Technology is expected to grow in size and funding over the coming years, and the fellowships are a great opportunity to make early connections with the larger program.  Fellowships support masters and early-stage doctoral students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines.  As with previous solicitations, proposals should focus on research in one of several high-priority technology areas outlined in the solicitation.  This year changes to the application process include:

  • The solicitation has been divided into two phases—Phase A is the responsibility of the student and Phase B is the responsibility of both the student and their university if the student is accepted for Phase A.
  • Tuition and fees allowance has been increased from $10,000 per year to $12,000 per year.

Awards are made in the form of training grants to the university and may not exceed $68,000 per year for each student.  The deadline for Phase A applications is December 4, 2012.

Source and Additional Information:

  • The full solicitation is available here.

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NSF Announces New Interdisciplinary Hazards Research Program Along with Dear Colleague Letter Seeking Involvement from Mathematicians and Statisticians

On September 19, the National Science Foundation (NSF) released a solicitation for a new program within the cross-foundational Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability (SEES) initiative.  Supported by five NSF directorates (Geosciences; Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences; Engineering; Mathematical and Physical Sciences; and Computer and Information Science and Engineering) and the Office of Cyberinfrastructure, Interdisciplinary Research in Hazards and Disasters (“Hazards SEES”) will fund truly interdisciplinary research projects that seek to better understand vulnerability and improve resilience to natural disasters and “technological hazards linked to natural phenomena.”   Following this solicitation announcement, on October 12, the Division of Mathematical Sciences released a Dear Colleague letter emphasizing that mathematicians and statisticians can play an important role in this program.

The program seeks projects that will “cross the boundaries of the atmospheric and geospace, earth, and ocean sciences; computer and information science; cyberinfrastructure; engineering; mathematics and statistics; and social, economic, and behavioral sciences.”  To be successful, a minimum of three principal investigators are required representing three or more of these disciplinary areas.  By creating interdisciplinary teams that meaningfully integrate disciplines, NSF hopes to achieve “new paradigms that contribute to creating a society resilient to hazards.”   NSF is offering two different project sizes: Type 1 funding will be used to create new interdisciplinary teams and Type 2 funding will support full-scale, integrated research projects.

NSF is seeking projects that are designed around one or more locations, themes, and/or hazards.  However, in order to achieve maximum impact, research should be transferrable and applicable to similar hazards globally, not just to the region studied.  In addition, proposals should describe how the project plans to incorporate education and training of future experts in hazards and disasters research.  Integration of early career researchers, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate and undergraduate students is encouraged.

Finally, to further promote transferability of research, proposals are encouraged that include linkages with other universities or research institutions, state, local and tribal governments, federal agencies and national laboratories, and private organizations.

As previously reported, SEES is a cross-NSF initiative involving the agency’s 11 directorates and offices to address interdisciplinary research and education needs as they relate to understanding the interactions between human and environmental systems.  The initiative was launched in fiscal year (FY) 2010 and has funded projects related to: water sustainability and climate, ocean acidification, biodiversity, climate change education, Earth-system modeling, sustainable energy pathways, and sustainability fellowships for early career scientists, among other activities.  NSF envisions SEES as a 10-year activity.

Hazards SEES is the fourth new program to be announced for FY 2013 under the SEES family of programs.  One final program is expected on the topic of information science and engineering.

Letters of Intent:  Not applicable.

Due Dates:  Full proposals are due February 4, 2013.

Total Funding and Award Size:  NSF anticipates making between 10 and 25 awards for a total program budget of $20 million. Proposals for Hazards SEES are sought at two different levels:

  • Type 1 Proposals should be used to bring together new interdisciplinary teams through exploratory research or networking activities that would foster new collaborations across disciplines.  Inclusion of early career researchers, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate and undergraduate students are particularly encouraged for Type 1 proposals.  Funding up to $300,000 for up to two years is anticipated for these awards.
  • Type 2 Proposals will support interdisciplinary teams to conduct “major new integrated hazards research.”  Awards up to $3 million will be provided for up to four years.

NSF does not predict how many Track 1 and Track 2 awards will be made.

Eligibility and Limitations:  U.S. academic institutions and non-profit, non-academic research organizations are eligible for Hazards SEES.  Investigators can appear on only one proposal.

Sources and Additional Information: 

  • The solicitation can be accessed on the NSF website.
  • The Division of Mathematical Sciences Dear Colleague Letter is available here.
  • More information about SEES and its suite of programs can be found on the SEES website.

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 DOD:  Office of Naval Research Releases Two FY 2013 Broad Agency Announcements

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) recently released both its broad agency announcement (BAA) for fiscal year (FY) 2013, as well as its Young Investigator Program BAA.  Details on both programs follow:

FY 2013 Broad Agency Announcement

Utilized by ONR and other Department of Defense (DOD) research offices in place of targeted solicitations, the BAA provides an overview of the areas where ONR intends to support basic (6.1) and applied (6.2) research and advanced technology development (6.3) in the coming fiscal year.  The research interests outlined in ONR’s FY 2013 BAA are similar to those from FY 2012, with Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering Zach Lemnios’ seven science and technology priorities having permeated across DOD’s research enterprise.

Beyond traditional ONR research interests within individual directorates and programs, improving decision making, promoting autonomous naval systems, enhancing reliance on modeling and simulation, modernizing sensing and communications technologies, and developing more portable devices and weapons systems are themes that cut across the BAA.  As with the FY 2012 BAA, there are numerous mentions of the need to improve DOD’s capacity to synthesize large data sets into actionable information.  This is consistent with a government-wide big data initiative launched by the Obama Administration.  These themes reflect the Administration’s efforts to prepare the military to better combat the asymmetrical threats which define modern conflicts.  In addition, the BAA seeks to support systems, devices, weapons, and other advancements which will contribute to the Administration’s emphasis on the Asia Pacific as the focus of future American military efforts.

Augmenting ONR’s core program priorities and cross-cutting themes, the BAA also states that ONR will continue its Basic Research Challenge in FY 2013.  Started in FY 2009, the Basic Research Challenge consists of Special Opportunity Notices (SON) throughout the year in basic research topics where ONR hopes to make transformative advances.  The areas in which ONR will issue SONs for FY 2013 remain unclear at this point.

Complete topics of interest for each of ONR’s six divisions – Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism (Code 30); Command, Control Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (Code 31); Ocean Battlespace Sensing (Code 32); Sea Warfare and Weapons (Code 33); Warfighter Performance (Code 34); and Naval Air Warfare and Weapons (Code 35) – are available in the full BAA.

White Papers: ONR encourages the submission of white papers before reviewing full proposals. Because of the authority granted to ONR program managers in making funding decisions, it is important for interested researchers to establish strong relationships early in the application process.  ONR program managers are often helpful in providing feedback on the extent to which proposed projects align with the current interests and mission of specific programs.  Appropriate program contacts can be found on the ONR website at http://www.onr.navy.mil/.

Total Funding and Award Size: ONR does not disclose the amount it anticipates awarding through this BAA.  Award size and length vary across programs, although most are in the range of three years.  Consistent with recent fiscal years, basic and applied research funding at ONR has remained relatively stable despite overall pressures on the defense research budget.  While Congress has not yet finished work on the FY 2013 defense appropriations bill, the Senate proposes significant increases for Navy science and technology (6.1-6.3) accounts and the House has allocated only slightly less, positioning ONR to be a winner in a time of budget austerity.

Due Dates: Proposals in response to the BAA will be accepted on a rolling basis until September 30, 2013 or until ONR issues a replacement.

Eligibility and Limitations: The BAA states that all responsible sources from academia and industry may respond to this call.  While ONR encourages submissions from researchers at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Institutions (MIs), no money will be set aside for applicants from these institutions.  DOD laboratories are not eligible to apply through this BAA.

Sources and Additional Information:

  • The complete BAA can be downloaded here.

Young Investigator Program BAA

The Young Investigator Program seeks to attract standout faculty in their first or second full-time, tenure track position in order to cultivate their research base at ONR.  The program often serves as a way for promising young faculty to break into Department of Defense (DOD) funding and familiarize them with DOD research activities.  Proposals must align with ONR’s research interests across its six departments— Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism (Code 30); Command, Control Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (Code 31); Ocean Battlespace Sensing (Code 32); Sea Warfare and Weapons (Code 33); Warfighter Performance (Code 34); and Naval Air Warfare and Weapons (Code 35).  Basic (6.1) and applied (6.2) research proposals are accepted; ONR will fund some advanced technology development (6.3) research through this BAA as well.

Potential applicants are encouraged to contact the appropriate program officer or division director to discuss research proposals.  Detailed descriptions of specific ONR program and division research foci can be found on the webpage below.  White papers are not required, but interested faculty may submit brief informal pre-proposals to facilitate these discussions.  Additionally, applicants must submit a supporting letter through an appropriate university official as ONR makes awards to institutions, not individual faculty.

This is a historically popular program; in FY 2012, 369 proposals were received, resulting in 25 awards.  Despite fierce competition, research proposals not selected through this program are still considered for ONR’s regular research programs, with many past proposals receiving funding this way.

Letters of Intent: Not applicable.  However, researchers can begin the process by contacting an appropriate program officer or division director to discuss research topics and how they align with ONR priorities.  DOD encourages this as a way to establish the most appropriate areas applicants should address.

Due Dates: Full proposals must be submitted by 4:00 PM Eastern time on January 4, 2013.  Questions regarding the program must be submitted by December 21.

Total Funding and Award Size:  ONR intends to award a total of up to $9 million through this BAA.  Proposals can request up to $170,000 annually for three years.  Cost sharing is not required.   ONR expects to fund about 17 proposals.

Eligibility and Limitations: The competition is open to faculty at U.S. institutions of higher education.

Sources and Additional Background:

  • The complete BAA can be found here.  
  • More information on ONR and its research foci can be found here.

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Sustainability:  NSF Announces New Cyber-Enabled Sustainability Program

On October 4, the National Science Foundation (NSF) released a solicitation for a new program within the cross-foundational Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability (SEES) initiative.  Supported by all seven NSF directorates and two offices (Computer and Information Science and Engineering; Geosciences; Engineering; Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Biological Sciences; Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences; Education and Human Resources; the Office of Cyberinfrastructure; and the Office of Polar Programs) and the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), the Cyber-Enabled Sustainability Science and Engineering (CyberSEES) program will fund projects that bring to bear creative interdisciplinary partnerships to address the computer and information science challenges associated with sustainability.  The goal is to “advance interdisciplinary research in which the science and engineering of sustainability are enabled by new advances in computing, and where computational innovation is grounded in the context of sustainability problems.”

Research and education in all areas of sustainability that depend in some way on advances in computation can be addressed through the CyberSEES program.  NSF will fund projects that seek advances in computation such as, but not limited to: “optimization, modeling, simulation, prediction, and inference; large-scale data management and analytics; advanced sensing techniques; human computer interaction and social computing; infrastructure design, control and management; and intelligent systems and decision-making.”  In addition, SRC will provide funding for proposals that address the computational aspects of “smart infrastructure,” particularly the smart electric grid.  Proposals funded by NSF will receive funding through a typical NSF grant, while funding from SRC will be provided through a contract.

According to the solicitation, projects will be funded that meet the following criteria:

  • “The research must be well-grounded in sustainability issues.
  • The research objective must advance computing or cyberinfrastructure knowledge, while enabling research in other disciplines.
  • The team composition must be synergistic and interdisciplinary, and must consist of at least two investigators from distinct and different scientific disciplines.
  • The project must address education and workforce development in sustainability science.”

A number of sample proposal topics are provided in the solicitation as additional guidance.

SEES is a cross-NSF initiative involving the agency’s 11 directorates and offices to address interdisciplinary research and education needs as they relate to understanding the interactions between human and environmental systems.  The initiative was launched in fiscal year (FY) 2010 and has funded projects related to: water sustainability and climate, ocean acidification, biodiversity, climate change education, Earth-system modeling, sustainable energy pathways, and sustainability fellowships for early career scientists, among other activities.  NSF envisions SEES as a 10-year activity.  CyberSEES is the final new program to be announced for FY 2013 under the SEES family of programs (the other programs released earlier this year include Coastal SEES, Arctic SEES, Hazards SEES, and a Dear Colleague Letter for Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering, and Materials).

Letters of Intent:  Letters of intent are required and due December 4, 2012 and the first Tuesday in December annually.

Due Dates:  Full proposals are due February 5, 2013 and the first Tuesday in February annually.

Total Funding and Award Size:  NSF anticipates making 12 to 20 awards for a total program budget of $12 million, contingent upon final appropriations from Congress.  Proposals are sought at two different levels:

  • Type 1 Proposals should be on the scale of proof-of-concept, capacity building, or exploratory research and education projects.  Projects should be led by at least two principal investigators. Funding up to $300,000 over two years is anticipated for these awards.
  • Type 2 Proposals are for collaborative teams of researchers for larger scale sustainability projects.  Awards up to $1.2 million will be provided over a four year period.

NSF does not predict how many Track 1 and Track 2 awards will be made.

Eligibility and Limitations:  U.S. academic institutions and non-profit, non-academic research organizations are eligible for CyberSEES.  Because of the collaborative nature of the proposals sought, investigators can appear on up to two proposals.  Each proposal must include at least two principal investigators from different disciplines.

Sources and Additional Information: 

  • The solicitation can be accessed on the NSF website.
  • More information about SEES and its suite of programs can be found on the SEES website.

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 Federal Agency News

 NSF: Fleming Crim Selected as Next Assistant Director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences

On September 25, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced that F. Fleming Crim would be the next head of the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS).  Dr. Crim is currently a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  His research focuses on studying chemical reaction dynamics with lasers.  He holds a bachelors degree from Southwestern University and a doctoral degree from Cornell University.

Dr. Crim will start his position at NSF in January 2013.  Celeste Rohlfing is currently serving as the Acting Assistant Director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences since the departure in early September of Ed Seidel, the previous head of MPS.

Sources and Additional Information:

  • The NSF press release announcing Dr. Crim’s appointment can be found here.

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OMB:  OMB Issues Sequester Report Outlining Potential Across-the-Board Spending Reductions in Early January 2013

On September 14, the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a report that outlines the potential across-the-board spending reductions scheduled to take effect on January 2, 2013 due to Congress’ failure last year to pass a deficit reduction package totaling at least $1.2 trillion over ten years.  Under the Budget Control Act of 2011 (debt limit agreement), Congress will enact the across-the-board sequester to achieve deficit reduction should the efforts of the Supercommittee fail as they ultimately did.

Prior to the August recess, Congress passed the Sequestration Transparency Act of 2012 that requires the President to submit a report to Congress on the potential impacts of the sequester.  In that report, the President makes clear that his Administration has no flexibility in calculating or implementing the sequester as defined in law.

According to the report, the sequester would be applied to more than 1,200 federal budget accounts as follows:

  • The overall reduction in spending would be an estimated $109.3 billion for fiscal year (FY) 2013.
  • The reduction would be split equally between defense and nondefense spending, with each being reduced by nearly $54.7 billion.
  • The estimated reduction for nondefense discretionary programs would be 8.2 percent (note: Pell grants are exempt from the sequester).
  • The estimated reduction for defense discretionary programs would be 9.4 percent, and reflects the President’s decision (as allowed by law) to exempt military personnel from the sequester.
  • Payments to Medicare providers would be reduced by 2.0 percent as capped in the law.
  • Other non-exempt, nondefense mandatory programs would be reduced by 7.6 percent.
  • Non-exempt, defense mandatory programs would be reduced by 10.0 percent.

The report notes that should the sequester actually be triggered in January, OMB would have to run the calculations and the sequester amounts could change.  The Administration underscores, however, that “the sequestration would be deeply destructive to national security, domestic investments, and core government functions.”  The President calls on Congress to work toward a “comprehensive and balanced deficit reduction plan” to avoid the sequester.  Republicans and Democrats have been unable to coalesce around a structure for doing so, with most proposals thus far being highly partisan.

The sequester would be applied to the FY 2012 enacted funding levels in the absence of final FY 2013 appropriations bills.  Examples of the potential funding impact of the sequester could be:

  • National Science Foundation (NSF) Research account – an estimated reduction of $469 million;
  • Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science – an estimated reduction of $400 million;
  • Department of Defense (DOD) Research, Development, Test & Evaluation (RDT&E) – each service and the defense-wide account would be reduced from an estimated $954 million (Army) to as much as an estimated $2.7 billion (Air Force); and
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) – an estimated reduction of $2.518 billion.

The sequester report provides the amounts of the sequester, but it does not include specifics about the programmatic impacts of such large potential funding reductions, which will be the questions now asked of the Administration.  The President and Congressional leaders will likely try to find an accommodation to address the pending sequester during the lame duck session following the election.

Sources and Additional Information:

  • The “OMB Report Pursuant to the Sequestration Transparency Act of 2012 (P.L. 112-155)” can be found here.

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Innovation: National Academies Releases Report on U.S. Innovation Policy for the Global Economy

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recently released a report entitled Rising to the Challenge: U.S. Innovation Policy for the Global Economy.  The report argues that the rapid transformation of the global innovation system means the U.S. must develop new innovation policies to ensure sustained leadership in the commercialization of innovation, which is vital to the U.S. economy and security.

The report asserts that the U.S. can no longer assume its leadership in science and technology will automatically lead to the commercialization of new discoveries into products, companies, industries, and high-paying jobs.  The report argues the U.S. must better understand its changing competitive position in the global environment and learn what other countries are doing to more aggressively develop their innovation agendas.  This report aims to affect policy and increase funding for innovation in the same way the 2007 National Academies report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm[1], did for research, development, and education.

The report compares how measures taken in other countries to support innovation relate to U.S. efforts in a number of areas.  Building on these findings, the report recommends a strategy to develop a U.S. innovation agenda that includes the following points:

  • Increase Research and Development (R&D) Investment – Fund R&D at the higher levels authorized under the America COMPETES Act, and sustain these levels to boost public and private R&D investment to three percent of gross domestic product (GDP) by 2020.
  • Sustain University Research – University research should be stabilized and then increased at the state and federal level.  Tax policies to increase revenue, and reducing regulations should also be addressed.
  • Help Small Business – Through programs such as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) along with new initiatives.
  • Support Higher Education – Federal and state governments to ensure higher education is affordable and available.
  • Attract Foreign Talent – Reform immigration laws to attract and retain foreign scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs.
  • Support Advanced Manufacturing – Support programs to accelerate the commercialization of new technologies, such as the proposed National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI)[2].
  • Foster Clusters – Regional economic development programs should be assessed and potentially expanded.  The federal government should award competitive grants to support modern science parks and technology development implementation centers focused on manufacturing.
  • Strengthen University Links to the Market – Expand programs to support the commercialization of university research and establish new centers of excellence to foster university-industry-government collaboration.
  • Promote Public-Private Partnerships – Expand partnership programs and potentially adopt models from overseas, such as Germany’s Fraunhofer Institutes[3].  Develop public-private consortia around specific emerging technologies, such as flexible electronics.
  • Capitalize on Globalization of Innovation – Cooperate with other nations through research collaboration and people exchange.

The report describes the current innovation picture in the U.S. and presents a number of case studies from other nations to draw useful lessons to help Congress, the Administration, and federal agencies shape U.S. innovation policy.  The 600 page report is sponsored by the following agencies: Office of Naval Research (ONR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Department of Energy (DOE), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Sandia National Laboratories.

Sources and Additional Information:

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Grand Challenges: DARPA and OSTP Release Request for Information on Grand Challenges of the 21st Century

On October 9, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), in conjunction with the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), released a request for information (RFI) to identify Grand Challenges in science and technology.  The RFI seeks to build on OSTP’s 21st Century Grand Challenges initiative which aims to catalyze scientific and technological breakthroughs by clarifying “ambitious yet achievable goals that capture the public’s imagination.”  As defined by OSTP, Grand Challenges can span numerous disciplines, as well as continents, and represent important societal problems with measurable finish points.

While there is no funding tied directly to this RFI, several of the Obama administration’s signature research efforts are categorized by OSTP as Grand Challenges including the Department of Energy’s “SunShot” and “EV Everywhere” initiatives and the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID) “Saving Lives at Birth” initiative.  The White House hopes that clarifying Grand Challenges will spur national efforts to achieve them both through public and private means.  The 21st Century Grand Challenges initiative is part of the Obama administration’s larger goal of increasing interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers and education as policy makers seek to sustain U.S. leadership and competitiveness in high-tech fields.

Topic Areas:  This RFI seeks topics with far-reaching societal impacts that require ground-breaking advances in science and technology, that have a defined finish point, and that can be easily communicated to broad audiences.

Letters of Intent:  None.

Due Dates:  All submissions must be emailed as attachments to DARPA by January 1, 2013.

Total Funding and Award Size:  There is no funding associated with this RFI, though select responses may be featured on the OSTP and DARPA websites.

Eligibility and Limitations:  There are no restrictions on who may submit suggestions.  The RFI encourages submissions from all ages and professional orientations and notes that submissions need not fall only under the Government’s purview.

Sources and Additional Information:

  • Additional information on the 21st Century Grand Challenges initiative, as well as the full RFI is available here and here.

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[3] Fraunhofer website

This update was prepared by Lewis-Burke Associates LLC.

 

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