SIAM Names 2012 Fellows

Philadelphia, PA

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) today announced its Class of 2012 Fellows. Nominated by the SIAM community, the 2012 Class includes 35 academics and professionals from the fields of applied mathematics and computational science. They are being recognized for their exemplary research in the field as well as outstanding contributions to the community, both of which help advance this broad discipline.

Tamer Başar is Swanlund Endowed Chair and a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is being conferred fellowship for his contributions to dynamic game theory and application to robust control of systems with uncertainty. His area of research spans information theory; communication systems and networks; security and trust; optimal, robust, and adaptive control; large-scale, decentralized systems and control; dynamic games; stochastic control and processes; estimation theory; and mathematical economics. Dr. Başar is a very active member of the community and a SIAM book author.

Michele Benzi is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Emory University. He is being recognized for his contributions to numerical linear algebra and its applications, especially sparse linear systems and preconditioning. His other research interests include scientific computing; sparse and structured matrix algorithms; iterative methods; multilevel algorithms; computational fluid dynamics; numerical methods for Markov chains; complex networks; and the history of numerical analysis and computing. Dr. Benzi has previously served as SIAM’s Council Member-at-Large and is a SIAM Visiting Lecturer.

Anthony Bloch, Alexander Ziwet Collegiate Professor at the University of Michigan, is being honored for his contributions to the dynamics and control of mechanical systems. Dr. Bloch’s main area of research includes analysis, applied mathematics and differential equations. Specifically, he is interested in Hamiltonian and Lagrangian mechanics; symplectic geometry; integrable systems; stability; nonholonomic systems; continuous and discrete flows; and nonlinear and optimal control. Dr. Bloch is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization.

Pavel Bochev is being recognized for contributions to numerical PDEs, especially least-squares finite element methods, stabilized finite element methods, and numerical software. He is a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories. His main research interests are in numerical analysis, applied mathematics and computational science, with a focus on compatible and alternative discretizations of PDEs and multiscale methods. Dr. Bochev is the Editor-in-Chief of the SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis.

Richard Brualdi of the University of Wisconsin at Madison is being honored for his contributions to linear algebra and combinatorics. He is an Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the university.  His research interests are in combinatorics/graph theory and matrix theory, especially the interplay between the two. In addition, he has studied problems in coding theory, partially ordered sets, and matroid theory. He has been active at past SIAM conferences and workshops.

Gui-Qiang Chen is Statutory Professor in the Analysis of Partial Differential Equations at the University of Oxford. He is being conferred the fellowship for his contributions to the mathematical analysis of PDEs, fluid mechanics, hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, and shock waves. His main research focus is in nonlinear PDEs and analysis, including their applications/connections to mechanics, geometry, and other areas of mathematics and the sciences. Dr. Chen has chaired the SIAG on Analysis of Partial Differential Equations and organized the associated conference in the past. He received the SIAG/Analysis of Partial Differential Equations Prize in 2011.

G. Bard Ermentrout is Professor of Computational Biology and Mathematics at the University of Pittsburgh. He is being recognized for his numerous contributions to applied dynamical systems and mathematical biology, in particular the theory of coupled oscillators and neural pattern formation. Due to his expertise in neurobiology, Dr. Ermentrout was an invited speaker at the First SIAM Conference on Life Sciences in 2002, and also contributed as an Editor for a SIAM News issue on Mathematics and the Brain in 2007. His research interests are in dynamics and phase resetting; noisy oscillators; pattern formation and waves and persistent states in neural systems; and in modeling the body’s inflammatory response. Dr. Ermentrout serves on the editorial board of the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems.

Richard Falk is being honored for profound and lasting contributions to the understanding of the stability and convergence properties of the Finite Element Method, and for his organizational service to the numerical analysis community. He is a professor in the Department of Mathematics at Rutgers University, and his main area of research is in the numerical solution of PDEs, specifically in the theory and applications of the finite element method and related aspects of numerical analysis and PDEs. Dr. Falk has been active in the SIAM community, and served on the prize selection committee for the James H. Wilkinson Prize in Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing in 2009.

Lisa Fauci of Tulane University is being recognized with the fellowship for her contributions to computational biofluid dynamics with scientifically relevant applications. Dr. Fauci is Pendergraft Nola Lee Haynes Professor of Mathematics at Tulane. Her research spans the areas of fluid dynamics, mathematical biology, and scientific computing, particularly in the use of methods from computational fluid dynamics to understand biological processes such as sperm motility, the neuromechanics of locomotion, and phytoplankton dynamics in the ocean. Dr. Fauci currently serves on the SIAM Board of Trustees, has previously served on the SIAM Council, and is a past Chair of the Activity Group on Life Sciences.

David Ferguson is being recognized as a SIAM Fellow for his pioneering efforts in the development and deployment of polynomial splines and constrained data fitting in the aerospace industry. He has had a long career in the mathematical sciences industry, developing advanced solutions for product design and formulation. He is currently a partner at Applied Mathematical Analysis, prior to which he spent 25 years at the Boeing Company. While at Boeing, he led the geometry research team, working on the geometric design and mathematical representation of parts, much of what enabled the company to replace physical mockups of aerospace vehicles with digital representations. Dr. Ferguson is a SIAM Visiting Lecturer and serves on the SIAM Industry Committee.

M. Gregory Forest is Grant Dahlstrom Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Biomedical Engineering, and Co-Director of the Institute for Advanced Materials, NanoScience and Technology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is being conferred the fellowship for his contributions to integrable and nearly integrable PDEs, material science, and to polymeric, liquid crystalline, and biological and biomedical fluid mechanics. His main areas of interest include mathematical modeling of complex fluids; biological soft matter; nano-particle dispersions; diffusive and hydrodynamic transport phenomena; and nonlinear waves.  Dr. Forest serves on the editorial board of the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics and is on the organizing committee for the 2012 Conference on Life Sciences.

Susan Friedlander, Professor of Mathematics and Director of the Center for Applied Mathematical Sciences at the University of Southern California, is being honored for her outstanding contributions to applied mathematics and for fostering activity in the field through original research, editorial work and conference organizing. Through her work, Dr. Friedlander has advanced the profession and served as a role model for young people, especially young women. Her areas of research include PDEs that describe the motion of fluids, and topics connected with fluid instabilities and mathematical models for turbulence. Dr. Friedlander is an active member of the community and has been an invited speaker at SIAM meetings.

Irene M. Gamba, Professor of Mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin, is being recognized for her contribution to analytical and numerical methods for statistical transport problems in complex particle systems. She holds the Joe B. and Louise Cook Professorship in Mathematics at the university. Dr. Gamba’s areas of research span applied and computational analysis; applied non-linear analysis; numerical analysis; mathematical and statistical physics; non-linear kinetic equations; PDEs and fluid and particle dynamics, and emerging complex phenomena in multilinear social interacting systems. Dr. Gamba has previously chaired the Activity Group on Partial Differential Equations, and served on the Committee on Gene Golub SIAM Summer School.

Walter Gautschi is being conferred fellowship for fundamental contributions to the constructive theory of orthogonal polynomials with applications to approximation theory. He is Professor Emeritus of mathematics and computer science at Purdue University. His research interests are in numerical analysis, constructive approximation theory, and special functions. He has been active in the SIAM community, serving on prize committees and contributing to the history project.

Donald Goldfarb is the Alexander and Hermine Avanessians Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research at Columbia University. He is being honored for contributions he has made to nonlinear, discrete, and convex optimization. His area of research interest includes algorithms for linear, quadratic, semidefinite, second-order cone, and general nonlinear programming; network flows; large sparse systems; applications in robust optimization; finance; image processing; compressive sensing; and machine learning. Dr. Goldfarb is serving on the selection committee for the 2012 Lagrange Prize in Continuous Optimization.

Sven Hammarling is semiretired from the Numerical Algorithms Group Ltd., and Senior Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester. He is being recognized for his contributions to numerical linear algebra, including the LAPACK (Linear Algebra PACKage) project. His research focuses on numerical linear algebra, portable numerical software, and LAPACK. Dr. Hammarling is an active member of the SIAM community, having contributed his expertise to the history project and SIAM’s poster submission guidelines. His contributions have also helped the SIAM Student Travel Fund.

Pavol Hell is one of the leading graph theorists in Canada. He co-authored one of the most acclaimed monographs on graph homomorphisms (with Jaroslav Nesetril) and is currently the Managing Editor of Journal of Graph Theory. Professor Hell’s scientific contributions are highly influential and frequently cited. He is very active within the SIAM community, having established the Dénes König Prize and initiated the CanaDAM conferences. Professor of Computing Science at Simon Fraser University, he is interested in algorithmic graph theory, complexity of algorithms, and combinatorics of networks. He has previously chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Discrete Mathematics, and served on the Dénes König Prize Selection Committee in 2010.

Bruce Hendrickson, Senior Manager for Computational Sciences and Mathematics at Sandia National Laboratories and Affiliated Professor of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico, is being recognized for contributions to combinatorial and parallel algorithms in scientific computing. His other research interests include linear algebra and preconditioning, graph theory, and data mining. Dr. Hendrickson is currently serving his second term as a member of the SIAM Council, and previously served as the Program Director for the SIAG on Supercomputing.  He serves on the editorial board of the SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications and is co-chair of the 2013 SIAM Annual Meeting.

Kirk Jordan of IBM Corporation’s T.J. Watson Research Center is being recognized for contributions to computational science and engineering, high performance computing applications, and leadership in industrial mathematics. An Emerging Solutions Executive at the Computational Science Center at IBM, Dr. Jordan’s areas of research are high performance and parallel computing, high-end computing and simulation in computational fluid dynamics, systems biology and high-end visualization. He is Chair of the SIAG on Computational Science and Engineering, and previously served as SIAM’s Vice President for Industry.

Michael Jordan is the Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is being honored for his contributions to machine learning, in particular variational approaches to statistical inference. His areas of interest include Bayesian nonparametric analysis; probabilistic graphical models; spectral methods; variational methods; kernel machines and applications to problems in statistical genetics; signal processing; computational biology; information retrieval; and natural language processing. He was a co-recipient of the SIAG/Optimization Prize in 2008.

James Keener is Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Utah. He is being conferred the fellowship for pioneering the mathematics of cardiac electrophysiology, elucidating scroll waves, the bidomain equations, and the mechanism of defibrillation. Dr. Keener’s main research focus is in developing and analyzing mathematical models of physiological processes, and in the identification and application of mathematical principles of dynamical systems to biological processes. He is actively involved in the SIAM community, serving on prize committees, and delivering invited lectures at SIAM meetings.

Naomi Leonard is Edwin S. Wilsey Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University. She is being recognized for distinguished contributions to the application of control theory to the control of underwater vehicles and for the coordination of ensembles of independent agents, as well as fundamental work in understanding the organization of animal schools and swarms. Her research interests include nonlinear control and dynamics; multi-agent systems; cooperative control; mobile sensor networks; adaptive ocean sampling; and decision dynamics in mixed teams of humans and robots. Dr. Leonard has previously served as the Secretary for the SIAG on Control and Systems Theory.

Philip Maini of the University of Oxford               is being honored for his contributions to mathematical biology. He is Professor and Director of the Center for Mathematical Biology at the Mathematical Institute at Oxford. His current work spans modeling of avascular and vascular tumors, and normal and abnormal wound healing, applications of mathematical modeling in pattern formation in early development, and the theoretical analysis of math models that arise in these applications. An active member of SIAM, Dr. Maini served on the Richard C. DiPrima Prize Selection Committee in 2010.

Geoffrey McFadden is a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Fellow in the Mathematical Modeling Group of the Information Technology Laboratory’s Mathematical and Computational Sciences Division at NIST. He is being conferred SIAM Fellowship for major advances in mathematics applied to fluid dynamics, solidification, and the interaction of the two, using sharp and diffuse interface theories. Dr. McFadden’s interests cover a range of areas including numerical and asymptotic solutions of differential equations, scientific computing, numerical analysis, hydrodynamic stability, crystal growth, and mathematical biology. An active member of the community, he has served on conference organizing committees and presented invited lectures at SIAM meetings.

Edward Ott, Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Physics at the University of Maryland, College Park, is being recognized for the breadth, depth, and vitality of his investigations of nonlinear dynamical systems, which highlight both theory and application. His area of focus is in the basic theory and applications of nonlinear dynamics, with current projects in wave chaos; dynamics on large interconnected networks; chaotic dynamics of fluids; and weather prediction. He was previously on the Advisory Board of the Dynamical Systems Activity Group.

Tamar Schlick is a Professor of Chemistry, Mathematics, and Computer Science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University. She is being conferred the fellowship for contributions to integration, optimization, and modeling techniques for the study of biomolecular structure and function. Dr. Schlick’s research team develops innovative molecular modeling, bioinformatics, and mathematical methods to study problems in DNA repair and fidelity mechanisms, chromatin folding, and RNA structure and function. Dr. Schlick has co-chaired and served on the organizing committees of past SIAM meetings.

David Shmoys is being recognized for his contributions to the design, analysis, and application of efficient discrete optimization algorithms in scheduling, facility location, networks, and sustainability. He is a professor in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering at the Department of Computer Science at Cornell University. Dr. Shmoys’ research focuses on design and analysis of efficient algorithms for discrete optimization problems, and in particular, on approximation algorithms for NP-hard and other computationally intractable problems. Dr. Shmoys has previously served as the Editor-in-Chief of the SIAM Journal on Discrete Mathematics, and has been on SIAM prize and program committees.

Mary Silber is a professor in the Department of Engineering Sciences and Applied Mathematics at Northwestern University. She is being honored for contributions to the analysis of bifurcations in the presence of symmetry.  Professor Silber’s research interests are in nonlinear dynamics and its applications, pattern formation, bifurcation theory, feedback control of patterns and bifurcations, delay equations, climate dynamics, and in the mathematical modeling of biological processes. Dr. Silber currently serves on the SIAM Council and on the editorial board of the journal, Multiscale Modeling and Simulation. She has also served on past SIAM prize committees.

Barry Smith of Argonne National Laboratory is being recognized for contributions in formulating a theoretical framework for domain decomposition, developing and implementing advanced solvers in the powerful software package PETSc, and simulating complex scientific and engineering phenomena on massively parallel architectures.   He is a Senior Computational Mathematician in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Lab, and his area of research includes parallel computing and the numerical solution of PDEs. An engaged member of SIAM, Dr. Smith has organized short courses and presented talks and lectures at SIAM meetings.

Tao Tang is Chair Professor in the Department of Mathematics, and Dean of the Faculty of Science at Hong Kong Baptist University. He is being conferred this recognition for his contribution to computational fluid dynamics, in particular, to the development of adaptive algorithms. His research interests also include scientific computation and numerical solution of PDEs, adaptive grid methods, high-order methods, and numerical analysis. He has previously served as President of the East Asia Section of SIAM.

Edriss Titi holds professorships in the Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics at Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, and in the Department of Mathematics, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. He is being recognized for contributions to analytical and computational studies of nonlinear partial differential equations with applications to fluid mechanics and geophysics. His studies lie at the interface of rigorous applied analysis and physical applications, focusing on the development of analytical and computational techniques for investigating nonlinear phenomena. Dr. Titi was awarded the SIAM Prize on Best Paper in Partial Differential Equations in 2009, has co-chaired past SIAM conferences, and served on prize committees.

Robert Vanderbei of Princeton University is being conferred fellowship for contributions to technologies for exoplanet searches and to interior-point methods for nonlinear optimization. He is Professor and Chair of Operations Research and Financial Engineering, and Associated Faculty Member in Astrophysics, Computer Science, Mathematics, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton.  Dr. Vanderbei’s main interests are in algorithms for nonlinear optimization and their application to problems arising in engineering and science, inverse Fourier transform optimization problems, and action minimization problems. Dr. Vanderbei has previously served as Vice Chair of the SIAG on Optimization, and been on the prize selection committee for the SIAG/OPT Prize.

Richard Varga is Emeritus University Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Kent State University. He is being honored for his contributions to matrix analysis, numerical analysis, complex variables, and approximation theory. His main areas of research fall under numerical analysis, approximation theory, and linear algebra. Dr. Varga edits several journals in the field of computational mathematics, numerical analysis and algorithms, and is a SIAM book author.

Jan Willems, a guest professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at K.U. Leuven in Leuven-Heverlee, Belgium, is being recognized for the development of conceptual and physical aspects of modeling dynamical systems. Dr. Willems’ principle areas of interest are systems theory; control and modeling; representation questions; system identification; and applications in control engineering, physics, and econometrics. He was previously a managing editor for the SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization and is a SIAM book co-author.

Thaleia Zariphopoulou is the Oxford-Man Professor of Quantitative Finance at the University of Oxford, and V.F. Neuhaus Centennial Professor in the Department of Mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin. She is being conferred the fellowship for contributions to stochastic control and financial mathematics. Her area of study includes financial mathematics, stochastic optimization, and quantitative finance, with specific interest in portfolio management, investment performance measurement, and valuation in incomplete markets.  Dr. Zariphopoulou has vice-chaired the SIAG on Financial Mathematics and Engineering for two previous terms, and has co-chaired and organized past conferences. She serves on the editorial board of the SIAM Journal on Financial Mathematics.

Our esteemed Class of 2012 Fellows will be honored at the SIAM Annual Meeting to be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota in July.

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