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Archive for July 2011

The 2011 W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize awarded to Irena Lasiecka

Professor Irena Lasiecka of the University of Virginia is the 2011 recipient of the W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize, which is awarded annually by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) for outstanding work in, or other contributions to, the broadly defined areas of differential equations and control theory. Established by SIAM in 1993, the prize is awarded either for a single notable achievement or a collection of such achievements.

Dr. Lasiecka is being recognized for her fundamental contributions in control and optimization theory, specifically for work in dynamical systems governed by partial differential equations and their applications. Read the rest of this entry »

David E. Keyes receives SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession

David Keyes (left) of Columbia University & King Abdullah University of Science and Technology receives the SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession from SIAM President Nick Trefethen at the CAIMS/Mprime/SIAM Awards Lunch at ICIAM 2011 Photo Credit: VisionPhot

Professor David E. Keyes of Columbia University and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia has been awarded the SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession.

Dr. Keyes is being recognized by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) for his leadership and long-term advocacy of high performance computing and computational science and engineering. Among other things, he has served on advisory committees for the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Read the rest of this entry »

Ralph E. Kleinman Prize awarded to Gunther Uhlmann

Gunther Uhlmann (left) of University of California, Irvine & University of Washington receives the Ralph E. Kleinman Prize from SIAM President Nick Trefethen at the CAIMS/Mprime/SIAM Awards Lunch at ICIAM 2011 Photo Credit: VisionPhot

Professor Gunther Uhlmann of the University of California, Irvine and the University of Washington was awarded the 2011 Ralph E. Kleinman Prize for his insightful and deep contributions to the theory of inverse problems.

Established in 1998, the Ralph E. Kleinman prize is awarded every other year by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) for notable research or other contributions that help bridge the gap between mathematics and applications. It rewards work that uses high-level mathematics or invents new mathematical tools to solve relevant problems in engineering, science, and technology. Read the rest of this entry »

Bjorn Engquist receives Peter Henrici Prize at ICIAM 2011

Bjorn Engquist (right) of UT-Austin receives the Peter Henrici Prize from SIAM President Nick Trefethen at the CAIMS/Mprime/SIAM Awards Lunch at ICIAM 2011 Photo Credit: VisionPhot

Professor Bjorn Engquist from the University of Texas at Austin is the 2011 recipient of the Peter Henrici Prize. He is being recognized for his fundamental contributions to applied and computational mathematics, scientific computing, and applications to engineering and the sciences, which have had a major impact in various areas of applied and computational mathematics.

Dr. Engquist delivered the award’s associated lecture, the Peter Henrici Prize Lecture on Wednesday, July 20, and received a cash award of $5,000 along with a framed, hand-calligraphed certificate at the CAIMS/Mprime/SIAM Awards Lunch the following day, both held as part of the 7th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2011). Read the rest of this entry »

Ingrid Daubechies of Duke University awarded The John von Neumann Lecture Prize at ICIAM 2011

Ingrid Daubechies of Duke University receives The John von Neumann Lecture Prize from SIAM President Nick Trefethen at the CAIMS/Mprime/SIAM Awards Lunch at ICIAM 2011 Photo Credit: VisionPhot

Professor Ingrid Daubechies of Duke University gave The John von Neumann Lecture on Monday, July 18, at the 7th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2011) held last week in Vancouver, British Columbia. This is the highest honor awarded by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM).

Her lecture, titled Sparsity in Signal Analysis and in Computation, gave an overview of sparse representations, presentations of functions and objects that manage to be both accurate and succinct. Dr. Daubechies’s lecture covered mathematical insights that can be applied to obtain sparse representations through the choice of wavelet and other bases, as well as the construction of such representations through mathematical tools and analysis. Read the rest of this entry »

Highlights from Day 4 ICIAM 2011

A Mathematical Theory of Climate Sensitivity - Michael Ghil Photo Credit:VisionPhot

Through his invited lecture, Toward a Mathematical Theory of Climate Sensitivity, Michael Ghil (Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris) elegantly described the mathematics behind the estimation of climate sensitivity by applying random dynamical systems (RDS) theory. He gave an overview of random attractors, and their significance in the analysis of such nonlinear, stochastically perturbed systems.  Describing the interplay between statistical mechanics and physics’ and dynamical systems theories in climate research, Ghil emphasized that a systemic view was important in order to apply engineering to tackle uncertainties about the future of climate change.

“We have a second brain; this brain, unfortunately does not do mathematics,” began Kerry Landman (University of Melbourne), in her talk, Our “Second Brain”: Modelling Its Development and Disease. Read the rest of this entry »

Professor Andrea Bertozzi on using applied math to study oil spills

Watch a video of Professor Andrea Bertozzi of the University of California Los Angeles talking about using math and physics to study the effects of oil spills at ICIAM 2011:

Recapping Day 3 at ICIAM 2011

Multiscale and Heterogeneous Models for Traffic Flow and Crowd Dynamics - Benedetto Piccoli Photo Credit: VisionPhot

We’ve all been stuck in traffic standstills at some point or another. How about using mathematics to ease vehicular traffic and congestion? That is precisely what Dr. Benedetto Piccoli (Rutgers University) described in his invited lecture, Multiscale and Heterogeneous Models for Traffic Flow and Crowd Dynamics. Piccoli began by explaining that vehicular traffic, networked robots, animal groups and crowd dynamics behave similarly because they consist of large groups of entities, where each individual agent can take decisions and influence the system. He discussed recent mixed models Read the rest of this entry »

Day 2 at ICIAM 2011

Metric Geometry in Action: Ron Kimmel

In his invited lecture on Metric Geometry in Action, Dr. Ron Kimmel (Technion Israel Institute of Technology) explained how similarities between surfaces, such as, faces under expressions, or bodies at different poses can be measured by treating geometric objects as metric spaces.

Applying the method of ‘multidimensional scaling’ to objects allows one to analyze targets numerically rather than analytically, he explained. Using the method to view an object as a surface of points, he demonstrated that it can be used to make very intricate distinctions, including distinguishing between identical twins. He further went on to explain how generalized multidimensional scaling can be used for texture mapping and for comparing intrinsic and external symmetries. Read the rest of this entry »

Rounding up Day 1 at ICIAM 2011

ICIAM 2011, the largest meeting for the applied math and computational science community, opened today with nearly 3,000 attendees from over 70 countries around the world.

Congress Director Rolf Jeltsch speaking at the Opening Ceremony Photo Credit: VisionPhot

At the opening ceremony, ICIAM 2011 Director Arvind Gupta and ICIAM President Rolf Jeltsch emphasized the importance of Congress activities in spotlighting the relevance of applied math research. The ceremony was highlighted by ICIAM prize recipients Emmanuel Candès (Collatz Prize), Alexandre Chorin (Lagrange Prize), Vladimir Rokhlin (Maxwell Prize ), James Albert Sethian (Pioneer Prize ) and Edward Lungu (Su Buchin Prize).

The 40th Anniversary meeting of the Association of Women in Mathematics, an embedded meeting of the Congress, opened with a session featuring Women at the Forefront of Applied Mathematics, organized by Dr. Maeve McCarthy (Murray State University) and Dr. Gerda de Vries (University of Alberta).

As part of the panel, Professor Leah Edelstein-Keshet (University of British Columbia) described various Models for Cell Polarization and Crawling, illustrating simulations of moving cells, which are useful in the study of cell shape and behavior. She illustrated two-dimensional mechanical cells that allow detailed analysis of cell-signaling cascades, in addition to cell polarization and movement.

In her talk, Imaging Biomechanical Parameters for Disease Characterization, AWM President Joyce R. McLaughlin (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) described technologies for shear stiffness imaging, which allow characterization of diseases such as breast and prostate cancers– as part of the same panel. Dr. McLaughlin elegantly described the viscoelastic models that are used to identify such cancers, including mathematical challenges encountered in such diagnosis, such as uniqueness and stability results. Dr. McLaughlin is a 2009 Class of SIAM Fellow. Read the rest of this entry »